Sin in the city

Las Vegas considered other attractions when the other game centers sprouting started up all over North America. The daring city in the theme parks the thought that if his vices are not admissible then he will be an agent in family excursions. He has mostly failed in this healthy attempt.

So now Vegas is forging a new identity not far from its vices; what he had in mind was a wonderful place to indulge in sinful fun. Here people do what they can not do at home uncomfortably and copiously.

And after learning from previous experience, most hotels and any other building stay free of themes. As one comedian said, “people come to Vegas to free”. Guests should be left to their imagination by looking for a place to stay and have fun.

According to studies, diet defects are so profitable simply. MGM Grand even stripped its amusement parks to make room for new nightclubs. They have gymnastics and sex nude aerobics. Clamps that dancers use are highly innovative in that they do not have ropes.

It is these vices that gave Vegas 35.5 million in income in 2003 and the title growing fastest in the main city in the United States. A huge chunk of revenue is due to its aging customers 30 and below. These guys are educated and with expendable incomes to spend in Vegas. Most of these young people are from Los Angeles and stay most of their time in the clubs.

A new Vegas intimidates investors not just by the huge incomes but by the larger and classy hotels of suite hotels only at 18 hoof golf courses on the strip. Large companies merge to give birth to far-flung casino hotels that

Kirk Kerkorian puts MGM Mirage and Mandalay Resource Group under an umbrella to form one of the largest gaming companies in the world. Sheldon Adelson thinks of a new big hotel while Steve Wynn is up to something huge and exaggerated. Watch out; high dwellings are next in line.

Now Vegas is not all casinos and gambling. It has paved the way for more hotels, bars, restaurants and malls. They realized that a tourist 4 days stay only 4 hours is spent on the gaming table or in front of the slot machine. In 2003, the shops in this oasis gave him a record of $ 32.8 billion in revenue.

Wealth does not seem to end there; everything in Vegas defines the class. For dining, Vegas has praised more of the main sommeliers than in combined whole states. His store carries famous names such as Louis Vuitton, and Armani. And do not forget Gucci and Dior.

Take a trip to Vegas and discover the best (and worst) of everything!

Gain by choice

The casinos have earned millions of dollars over the years because of the players. Well, we think it’s about the time players get at something from casinos. We are not talking about your average run of mill players who trust all their money on luck. We are talking about those players who are determined to learn how to play smart and win by choice.

The first thing you need to know is that the more you are willing to spend on the game, the higher the chance of you winning. Since if you play bad luck and lose in the previous part of the game, you more than likely will run out of play money before you have a chance to win something.

Once you start making money, you will have more than one chance to win even more. Positive you can participate in the game longer, which is a key to winning. To make him shorts, the longer you can play, the better your chance to win a certain amount of money. This maxim is true regardless of the particular game you play.

While playing, always consider what you are doing. Always ask yourself if you bet on good luck. And ask yourself if you bet the right amount of money. There are couples of techniques to learn in the game, which will give you a better understanding of how the probability and statistics of the game work. Searching online or reading books about your game of choice is a fantastic way to increase the odds in your favor.

Another thing you need to know about the game and probably one of the most important tips you should know when to quit. It is very difficult for a gaming purist to leave a table, but all successful players know when it’s not their day and to stop before losing everything.

It is difficult for players to stop playing especially when they win because of the intrinsic rush and excitement of the game but it is only when we stop. Order and discipline is the key.

As we said, the longer you can play the better the chances of you winning are better.

Unfortunately, this also applies to the home. Casinos have a vast amount of money at their disposal; they can play longer than you ever could. And like the theory, they have a better chance of winning. Fortunately for you, unlike them, while casinos are tied to the game until you have reached the table limit, you make a choice to quit while you are ahead. Beat the casino table is a dream, but you have to look at the reality of things. It is for you to lose all that you have won rather than hitting the jackpot.

Backgammon label

Here’s the common label seen in backgammon. These are seen in both real and electronic backgammon game.

Appropriate label

1. Use a friendly tone by greeting your competitors at all times. Simply do not proceed and do not roll the dies.

2. Always say goodbye after a match. Thank the player for a nice game, or one that gives you some comfort.

3. On a double, gently put the cube in the middle, and say double. For a hold, place it on your side and say “take. When you drop, place the cube correctly where it belongs. and clearly push the “down” or “pass”.

4. Points should be monitored by both parties. You should declare points or accept your opponent’s statement of points after each game. In a Crawford game, the points announcement should be made during the start and the cube must be removed from the board.

5. Before rolling, the dies must be shaken three times. Avoid shaking when your opponent is playing or considering about a game.

6. Stay silent and while your opponent is always calm and always while your opponent is evaluating or playing.

False label

1. Avoid mentioning your opponent’s luck or lucky spins, in duration or at the conclusion of the match. It is similar to assuming that he wins or has won because of luck not by his qualifications.

2. Do not describe the wrong roll of your opponent or your good bearings. He is boring and whimsical.

3. Avoid holding the doubling cube if you want to say to double. In fact, obviously or secretly, it could have been a kind of dishonesty.

4. Unless your competitor is picking up his dice, never roll the dice. Premature turnover, or at the same time it takes its dice, can cause conflict over whether or not the bearing counts, or whether the player is contemplating about his game. This also unjustly speeds up the competitor in the game.

5. Avoid laughing or laughing nervously when your opponent turns a bad ride, or rejoicing when you get a good ride.

6. Avoid delaying. It’s not bad if you’re considering a real hard decision about your game. Even seasoned veterans need time to evaluate any conditions. However, taking too long on a basic decision between two games at game parties is totally unacceptable.

7. Avoid talking with people in the other table. Avoid small conversations and focus your attention on the game.

8. If you want to take a break and take down a council position for future assessment, ask your competitor if he is well. Do it quickly and avoid doing it a lot of times.

9. Avoid saying “nice roll” or “good play” after every good roll and after every game. Giving the compliment is just like telling your opponent that he was just lucky.

Understanding and Calculating Pot Odds in Poker

As someone who plays poker several hours a week, I am constantly amazed at the number of players I run into who don’t understand exactly what pot odds are. Calculating pot odds is absolutely essential to maximizing the profit of each hand you play. As such, I’ve decided to write this article explaining how to calculate pot odds for those who have yet to figure out why it’s so important.

Most people are familiar with the term odds. For those of you who aren’t, odds are the statistical probability that something will or will not happen. Odds are typically verbalized by saying “5 to 1”, or “3 to 1”, and are expressed in the following notational format: 5:1, 3:1, etc. If there’s a 10 percent chance of rain, it means there’s a 90 percent chance of it NOT raining. Thus, the probability of it raining would be 90:10, or 9 to 1 against.

Still Confused? Let’s look at another example:

Let’s say you roll a single die. There are six possible outcomes: the numbers 1 through 6. What would the odds be of rolling any single number on that die? Well, you have a 1 in 6 chance of rolling any particular number. Five of those numbers lose for you, while 1 does not, so the odds of rolling any particular number are 5 to 1 against.

Ok, I understand what odds are. What the heck are pot odds, and how do I calculate them?

Simply put, pot odds is the ratio between the money already in the pot and the money you will need put into the pot to keep playing. For example, let’s say there are 300 chips in the pot. Your opponent, who is first to act, bets 100 chips. There are now 400 chips in the pot (300 original + the 100 chip bet). In order to keep playing, you must match the bet made by your opponent of 100 chips. This means the pot odds are 400 (money in the pot) to 100 (what you need to call). Broken down more simply, 400:100 can be factored down to 4:1, or 4 to 1 pot odds.

That’s all great, but why exactly should I care what my pot odds are?

You should care because poker isn’t just a game of skill; it’s also a game of probability. In order to maximize your long term profit, you will need to understand the basic concepts of probability and its place in poker. Without a proper understanding of how it applies to your game, you could find yourself folding and calling at the mathematically incorrect times.

Ok, losing money is a good enough reason. Show me how calculating pot odds can improve my game.

First off, knowing how to calculate pot odds doesn’t do you much good by all by itself. However, when you compare your pot odds with the odds of winning a particular hand, you have a very powerful tool at your disposal. Let’s take a look at a “non-poker” related example…

Let’s say someone approached you with an offer. They were going to flip a coin 100 times. Every time heads hit, they had to pay you two dollars. Every time tails hit, you had to pay them 1 dollar. Who is getting the better end of the deal? Certainly you are because you are getting 2 units of money for every one that you are risking (2:1 money odds), on a gamble that is 50:50, or 1:1.

Many poker situations are no different. Let’s say you’re on the button with A4 of spades. One player has already limped in front of you. You elect to limp in behind them. The small blind folds, and the big blind checks. The pot is 175 chips going heading to the flop. The flop comes K of diamonds, 8 of spades, 5 of spades. The big blind (who was short stacked) bets out his last 100 chips, and the early limper decides to fold. Now, you’re fairly certain that the big blind has a king with a small kicker, or possibly an eight, which means you’re currently behind in the hand to his pair. How do you know whether or not it’s mathematically correct to call?

The first thing to figure out here is what your pot odds are. There were 175 chips in the pot before your opponent bet. He then added his remaining 100 chips. For you to call and see the remaining two cards, you must call his 100 chips. Thus, the pot odds are 275:100, or 2.75 to 1. The next thing to figure out is what your odds of winning are. Assuming he does indeed have a pair, any ace will win the hand for you, as would any spade. There are 3 aces left in the deck, and 9 spades. Your 12 outs give you roughly a 45% chance of winning with two cards to come. Thus, your odds of winning are 55:45, or 1.22:1. Over the long run, calling this bet will be profitable because when you win (45% of the time), you will win 275 chips. Conversely, when you lose (55% of the time) you will lose only 100 chips. Your primary goal is to have better pot odds than winning odds. As long as you keep taking gambles that are in your favor from a pot odds perspective, you will come out ahead mathematically.

Any solid player will tell you that knowing how to calculate pot odds is an essential part of any poker player’s toolbox. By understanding how it applies to your poker strategy, you will increase your overall profitability by folding or chasing in the right spots.

Should I play the player or play the cards

There are two common phrases I hear from poker players when discussing strategy.

I don’t play the cards, I play the player.
I don’t worry about tells too much, I just play my cards.
Typically I’ll hear the first phrase from more aggressive players. The second is a common statement of very tight players.

So which of these two has the better approach? In reality, taken as a single statement on how to play poker correctly, they’re probably both wrong. Poker is not just a game of cards or players; it’s a game of situations.

Focusing on only your cards will work very well against loose passive players. They will pay off your value bets, but won’t push you off the hand with re-raises. However, when you run into a solid player who’s been paying attention to your play, he will pay off none of your value bets, and will bluff you off all your mediocre holdings. Because you’re not paying attention to what’s going on around you, or what type of image you’re portraying at the table (rock), you will slowly get taken out by more astute players.

Conversely, if you’re only focusing on the players and don’t have a solid understanding of the fundamentals (starting hands, odds, etc), you may find yourself making critical mistakes like paying too much for draws, overplaying top pair, or betting when it has a negative EV. These mistakes will eventually take their toll and eat away your chip stack.

While both of these philosophies have flaws independently, they are superb as a team. A good poker player should absolutely have a solid understanding of odds, and know how to play their cards correctly. However, they should also have the ability to read their opponents and know when to deviate from that “correct” strategy.

If you’re a rock, start paying attention to the betting patterns of other players and look for bluffing and stealing opportunities. If you’re an aggressive player, make sure you take a look at the leaks in your fundamentals. Read books, study game theory, and make sure you know the odds you’re facing in any given situation. It will go a long way to improving your results at the poker table.

Play Better Poker A Lesson From Roshambo

The game of Roshambo (commonly known as rock, paper, and scissors) is fairly simple. You stand opposite your opponent, make a fist, and on the count of three you each make the shape of either a rock, a piece of paper, or a pair of scissors.

So how can this simple game possibly teach us how to play better poker?

Imagine for a second that you and the other players at the poker table were going to play individual matches of roshambo instead of poker hands. What kind of strategy would you employ to gain a winning edge? Would you be the rock each time? How about a pair of scissors? Would you be something random each and every hand?

If you had to show down a rock each time you were in a match, after a while you might start to get worried that someone would catch on and always play paper against you. You would be aware of how you’d played to this point, and likely try to keep your opponents on their toes by sometimes showing down a paper or scissors.

One would think that players would take that same logic with them to the poker table. However, the simple truth of the matter is that most poker players tend to play roughly the same way each hand. They develop a certain style that works for them and they go with it. Some players choose to be aggressive, others conservative. Some like to see an insane amount of flops, others only play their premium starting hands. While playing a single style may keep you from losing money, it will also keep you from winning it consistently. If you’re always a rock, and you sit down at a table of scissors, you’ll make a healthy profit. However, if you sit down at a table with a blend of different players (which is far more typical), you’ll be lucky just to break even.

So what’s the correct strategy? The bottom line is that if you’re going to maximize your profit in poker, you must learn to exploit the tendencies of other players. If you run into a rock, you must become a piece of paper. If you run into a piece of paper, you must be a pair of scissors. You have to be comfortable playing a different style against each opponent. If you don’t ever change gears, your strategy will only be effective against certain types of players, and you’ll pose no real threat to an astute opponent who has been paying attention to your tendency of always choosing rock. He will simply become a piece of paper and take you out.

You should get comfortable playing a style that is outside your normal comfort zone. That way, when your next poker (or roshambo) battle comes along, you’ll choose the best weapon for the situation instead of simply going with the one you know best.

Heads Up Poker Strategy – Just How Different is it

In my opinion, heads up poker is “full table texas holdem on speed”. While your starting hand requirements go out the window, I think many of the same success formulas still apply.

Below are some strategy pointers for improving your heads up battles:

Don’t approach every opponent the same. If they’re being overly aggressive, trap more often. If they’re playing weak-tight, punish them with raises and steals.

Make more raises when you’re in position… you’ll make far more money from there.

Don’t fold your small blind unless you hold complete trash AND your opponent raises nearly every hand. But on the whole, very few hands are that far behind pre-flop. You want to play in position, even with less than premium cards.

Watch his betting patterns very closely. Look for discrepancies or patterns and try to exploit any tells you can get. Does he bet every time you check? If so, how much in relation to the pot?

Watch the hands that he shows down and keep track of how he played his top/middle/bottom pairs, draws, etc. You can use it to make good decisions later.

A solid check raise, even with nothing can get you plenty of free cards later.

Always pay attention to your image and play accordingly. If you’ve taken down two pots in a row without showing (even if you had top pair both times), it’s likely a bad time for a bluff, and a good time for value bets.

If you run into one of these “all in every hand” clowns, don’t call unless you have a monster. However, when you find yourself with any two decent cards, and you’re first to act, do the same back to him. Put HIM in the hot seat. This should make him a little uneasy, and he’ll likely knock it off.
Remember, heads up poker is more of a boxing match, so don’t be afraid to get in there and start swinging. Focusing more on these heads up strategies and less on the actual cards should improve your heads up results greatly.

Don’t play like the pros do yet.

Learning how to play no limit holdem is a fairly simple undertaking. Learning how to play it well is a task that has no end. Mike Sexton, WPT commentator and professional poker player, coined the popular phrase: “no limit holdem takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master”.

Quite often, I run into beginners whose poker education consists mainly of televised tournaments. They watch their favorite pros splashing about with various junk hands and they assume that this is the best way to play. While learning to play all types of hands in all types of situations is a mandatory skill for all good holdem players, there are a few problems with this strategy as it applies to beginners:

The hands you see on television have been pre-selected for their entertainment value. So while it appears that these pros are playing every single hand, the majority of the hands being played actually involve a single raiser and everyone folding (not nearly as exciting for TV viewers).

Pros don’t play this way all the time. TV poker is usually short-handed (6 or less players), and is typically in the late stages of a major tournament. The added pressure of escalating blinds and quicker rounds forces them to play more hands.

Professionals have played thousands of hours of poker. They know when to lay down middle pair, and when to re-raise all in with it. That type of skill can only come with time and practice. Beginners simply do not have experience to know what to do with their junk hands after the flop.
In general, the number one mistake I see new holdem players making is that they simply play too many hands. While mixing it up and aggression are certainly part of any good player’s arsenal, that type of skill must be built on top of a solid understanding of the game. Being tight early on in your poker career brings many advantages:

The cost of learning how to play is much cheaper. Since you’re not playing as many hands, you’re not making as many mistakes. Not making as many mistakes means you’re not losing at much money.

You can observe and learn an incredible amount when you’re not concentrating on your own hand. Observation is one of the key skills you must have to improve as a poker player. If you can sharpen this skill early on, it will be very useful later when you’re mixing it up with 74 off suit.

You can spend time learning how to properly play your good cards. I still see many semi-experienced players who get dealt Ace-King or a big pocket pair, and have no idea how to make the most money with it.

You learn how to be patient with the game. Patience is absolutely mandatory when playing no limit tournaments. If you learn how to stay out of pots now, you can make it through a bad string of cards no problem later.
While everyone wants to make the big bluff and show garbage, or limp in with junk and call a huge all-in bet with middle pair and have it hold up, these types of moves should be built on a solid foundation of poker knowledge.

Always Have a Good Reason to Bet the River

A fundamental mistake made by newer poker players is betting the river with a mediocre hand. Why is this such a costly mistake? Because when you bet a mediocre hand, you’re only likely to be called by a hand that has you beat.

Overall, betting a mediocre hand on the river, such as bottom or middle pair with a weak kicker, will lose you money. This play has what is commonly referred to as a negative expected value, or negative EV. When you bet the river with a mediocre hand, there are two likely outcomes:

Your opponent folds a worse hand, and you make nothing.
Your opponent calls with a better hand, and you lose money.
By checking down your mediocre hands, you will win the hands that are worse than yours (and not worth a call on the river), and save money on the hands he would have called your bet with.

So when should you bet the river?

1. You think your opponent has a worse hand than you do, and you’ll get a call.

If you suspect that your opponent has a pair worse than yours, or a weaker kicker, it’s a good reason to bet the river. For example, let’s say you decide to limp in early position with AJ. A couple of stragglers come in behind you. The flop is A84 rainbow. The blinds check and you bet out a ½ pot-sized bet. A late position player gives you a call, and everyone else folds. The turn is a 2. You bet out ½ the pot again, and he again flat calls. The river is another 4. Should you bet here? The answer to this question is yet another question: what do you think your opponent has?

In the absence of draws, if you have a read on your opponent’s play as being fairly passive, it’s probable that he’s in there with an Ace lower than yours. If he had A8, you’re fairly certain he’d have raised with it.

You decide through a read of your opponent, and his play up to this point that he is on AT. A bet here likely makes you a little bit more money. If you check, he will probably check behind you, so you have to lead out with a reasonable bet and hope he calls with his worse kicker.

2. You think your opponent has a better hand than you, but will fold to a reasonable bet.

Let’s say you’re on the button with 78 of hearts. A tight player in middle position limps in, and you follow along. The blinds flat call. The flop is A65 rainbow. The blinds check, and the limper bets 1/3 of the pot. Now, you’re getting 4:1 on your money to chase your well disguised straight draw so you elect to call. The blinds fold. The turn brings a Q, and the limper checks to you. You suspect he might have just been taking a stab at a bluff on the flop, or he might be weak here (small pocket pair, Ace with a bad kicker, etc), but you’re not quite sure just yet. You elect to take the free card off and make a decision on the river. The river brings a 2, and you’ve completely missed your draw.

Your tight opponent checks to you, again. What’s your move?

This is a perfect example of a time to bet with a nothing hand. Your opponent checked to you twice in a row, including the river (his last chance to make money off you). This almost always indicates weakness. If you check, you most certainly lose to his small pair, or higher kicker. Since he’s a fairly tight player, he’s not likely to call you down with a weak hand. Bet out something near the size of the pot (assuming it’s a moderate portion of his stack), and he’ll likely go away.

As you can see, making this simple adjustment to your game can make you a lot of money by ensuring that your good hands are paid off, your bad hands have a chance to win, and your mediocre hands don’t get you into trouble.